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Tyvek reinvent battens

Josh | Posted in Green Building Techniques on

Anyone have experience with this product? I’m considering using it as furring strips over roxul comfortboard and under lp smartside. I’m a little concerned about termites with regular wood furring strips even though I’ve read that is not a problem. Termites are nasty in MO. Thanks
Josh

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Replies

  1. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #1

    Josh,
    I was confused by your question. It's possible that you were typing on a device with some type of Auto-Correct software that changed the spelling of what you were trying to type.

    I'm guessing that you wanted to write "RainVent." Here is a link:
    DuPont RainVent batten.

    RainVent battens are made of polypropylene. Like other brands of plastic rainscreen battens, these battens won't hold nails like ordinary 1x4s will, so a builder will need to plan ahead for siding fastening details. You'll usually need to know where the studs are, and you'll need longer fasteners than you would if you used 1x4s.

    In my 2013 article "All About Rainscreens," I wrote,

    "At least six manufacturers sell plastic furring strips:
    • BattensPlus manufactures BattenUp furring strips. These pieces of polypropylene strapping measure 1 1/2 inch wide by 1/2 inch thick by 48 inches long.
    • Drain-Plane sells polyethylene furring strips.
    • El Dorado makes plastic battens that measure 1 5/8 inch wide by 3/8 inch deep by 8 feet long.
    • VaproShield makes a plastic batten called VaproBatten.
    • Cor-a-Vent makes plastic furring strips called Sturdi-Strips.
    • DCI Products makes plastic furring strips called CedarVent strips.

    "Coroplast battens, BattenUp battens, El Dorado battens, Sturdi-Strip battens, and CedarVent strips all have channels that allow water to drain right through the products, even when installed horizontally. VaproBattens aren’t designed for horizontal installation, and won’t drain that way.

    "Note that none of these plastic battens are good at holding nails and screws, so you’ll need long fasteners that reach to the studs if you go this route."

    .

  2. Josh | | #2

    Thank you as always Martin. You are correct about the auto-correct. Has anyone used longer fasteners on with Roxul that go directly to the stud? If I were to do that, would I even need battens? Finally, if not, could someone suggest an alternative? I did read your article but I am concerned that wood 1x4 will either rot or attract termites. I appreciate all the help. This website is awesome for a guy like me.

    Thanks,
    Josh

  3. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #3

    Josh,
    The 1x4 furring strips aren't going to rot, unless you are doing something very wrong. Rainscreen gaps stay dry.

    Check with LP on your plan -- in general, you can't install SmartSide over continuous insulation if the continuous insulation is more than 1 inch thick. If the continuous insulation is more than 1 inch thick, LP says you need 1.5 inch thick furring strips (in other words, 2x4s). You can't use plastic battens or 1x4s.

    The instructions talk about rigid foam, but I imagine the same requirements apply to mineral wool.

    Here is a link to the instructions:
    https://lpcorp.com/resources/product-literature/installation-instructions/lp-smartside-strand-substrate-lap-siding-application-instructions-english

    The relevant section reads:

    "• For rigid foam sheathing up to 1 in. (25.4 mm) thick, siding may be nailed directly to the foam sheathing unless a drainage plane is required by the local building code. Nail length must be increased to ensure a minimum 1-1/2 in. (38.1 mm) fastener penetration into the structural framing.
    • For rigid foam sheathing greater than 1 in. (25.4 mm), a minimum 1-1/2 in. (38.1 mm) thick by 3-1/2 in. (88.9 mm) wide vertical strapping or furring strip must be installed over the sheathing to provide a solid, level nailing base for the siding. The strapping must be securely fastened to structural framing spaced no greater than 16 in. O.C. (406 mm) with a minimum nail penetration of 1-1/2 in. (38.1 mm) and a maximum nail spacing no greater than the width of the siding."

  4. Robert Opaluch | | #4

    Pressure-treated lumber or pressure-treated plywood could be used for furring strips and not be damaged by termites. But termites could tunnel into the wall to reach the framing if they get into the rain screen. Somewhere you need a termite barrier. I've heard about but have no experience with Termi-mesh stainless steel mesh or copper mesh products, used for a barrier along the foundation. Pangowrap is a termite, soil gases and water barrier sheet product for slab foundations. A 2" gap along the foundation (to inspect for termite tunnels), or treating the ground around the foundation to destroy termites are possible options. I'd like to know more about this topic!

  5. Josh | | #5

    Thanks Robert. I have read that termites will not eat mineral wool. The LP is treated with sodium borate and my sheathing will be covered will either be zip wall or plywood covered with PROSOCO WRB so I don't think that will be attractive to termites. The furring strips may be a different story and I haven't figured out a termite screen for that. I couldn't get anyone from Termimesh to call me back. However, I may check with Polyguard. They have a barrier system that I am using on other parts of my house. Great people to work with. http://www.polyguardproducts.com/term/

  6. John Clark | | #6

    Termites shouldn't be an issue if you have an insect screen, keep shrubs/bushes away from the side of the house (IIRC 3ft or more) and your slab is tall enough (6" or more) where you can perform a visual inspection (as you should already be doing) for termite tubes.

  7. Josh | | #7

    Robert

    I talked to the great folks at polyguard and they do sell an insect mesh that can be cut to length for an insect barrier if you or anyone else need that.

    Thanks
    Josh

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