GBA Logo horizontal Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Navigation Search Icon Main Search Icon Video Play Icon Audio Play Icon Headphones Icon Plus Icon Minus Icon Check Icon Print Icon Picture icon Single Arrow Icon Double Arrow Icon Hamburger Icon TV Icon Close Icon Sorted Hamburger/Search Icon

Community and Q&A

Different one-part foams

Jamie Royal | Posted in Green Products and Materials on

Hey folks,

I’m installing XPS/EPS rigid foam against my basement walls. I’ve seen and read on FHB using low-expanding as the adhesive to hold the foam on the walls. I’ll be framing a 2×4 wall in front of the rigid foam, so the adhesive only needs a moderate hold.

Great Stuff Window & Door is by far the most common spray foam I see. Its in the big box stores, Amazon, etc. I’ve put up a few rigid foam sheets in the basement as a test with the Great Stuff and the hold is fine.

However, I’ve come across another Dow one-part spray foam, Enerfoam, and it is also low-expansion. And unlike the Great Stuff Window & Door, the Enerfoam lists adhesion of rigid foam as one of its applications. The Enerfoam is a couple dollars extra per can, and I’ll be using quite a few cans before the basement is finished. I was wondering if anyone had an opinion if the price premium was worth it for was I was looking to do? Anyone have experience with both?

Thanks,
–Jamie

GBA Prime

Join the leading community of building science experts

Become a GBA Prime member and get instant access to the latest developments in green building, research, and reports from the field.

Replies

  1. User avatar GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #1

    Jamie,
    I think the less expensive canned spray foam will work fine. Don't forget to tape the seams of the rigid foam to prevent indoor air from contacting the cold concrete. (Foil-faced polyiso is the easiest type of foam to tape.)

    -- Martin Holladay

  2. Erich Riesenberg | | #2

    There is also GREAT STUFF™ PRO™ Wall & Floor Polyurethane Foam Adhesive.

    I used something like Liquid Nails as a temporary hold, some of the time, and then attached furring strips. Most of the time, I did not need an adhesive, because the friction fit was tight enough to hold the foam until the furring strip was installed.

    It is important to avoid solvent based, which burn the foam.

  3. User avatar
    Dana Dorsett | | #3

    The solvents in Liquid Nails can compromise rigid foam. Using purpose-made foam board construction adhesive would be a better approach (slightly more expensive per tube, but way lower VOC.) Most polyurethane caulks would work fine as an adhesive too, but they can be as expensive than foam board construction adhesive (or even more.)

  4. Jamie Royal | | #4

    Thanks folks. I'll stick with the lower cost, and better available, Window & Door foam for adhering the panels.

    --Jamie

  5. User avatar
    Sean Cotter | | #5

    I used Loctite PL300 to adhere EPS and XPS to my basement walls. Worked great, less messy than foam can stuff. Also, it just held (simple deadman) after a bit of curing. What I don't get with the expanding foam, wouldn't it push off the walls a bit?

Log in or create an account to post an answer.

Community

Recent Questions and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |