The most recent blogs at Green Building Advisor

Building a Low-Cost Zero-Energy Home

Posted on October 6, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

Let’s say that your goal is to build a simple net-zero-energy home for your family. You insist that the home be energy-efficient, and you plan to include a photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. (PVPhotovoltaics. Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic (PV) cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.) array that is large enough to balance your annual energy needs.

Your main stumbling block is that your budget is very tight. Is your goal attainable?

Perhaps. Many builders have managed to complete a net-zero home that costs only a little bit more than a conventional house. If you want to take a similar approach, consider the following principles.

Why Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Won’t Lead to Action on Climate Change

Posted on October 5, 2017 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By SCOTT GABRIEL KNOWLES

The Difficulties of Third-Party HVAC Design

Posted on October 4, 2017 by Allison A. Bailes III, PhD in Building Science

What if a builder refused to build from plans drawn by an architect? What if a tile installer refused to implement designs handed to them and instead did their own thing? What if an HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. contractor told a potential client they wouldn't install a system designed by a third party to ACCA protocols?

One of those questions is more real than the others. Of course builders build from architects' plans and tile installers don't throw out designs they're asked to implement. But third-party HVAC design is a different animal.

Flatrock Passive: Framing and Air Sealing

Posted on October 3, 2017 by David Goodyear in Guest Blogs

Editor's Note: This is one of a series of blogs by David Goodyear describing the construction of his new home in Flatrock, Newfoundland, the first in the province built to the Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. standard. The first installment of the GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com blog series was titled An Introduction to the Flatrock Passive House. For a list of Goodyear's earlier blogs on this site, see the "Related Articles" sidebar below; you'll find his complete blog here.

Gas vs. Electric for Heating, Cooking, and Hot Water

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Scott Gibson in Q&A Spotlight

Lydia Segal is planning a 2,000-square foot house in Colorado (Climate Zone 6B), and aiming for "Pretty Good House" performance. Among the many questions she's trying to answer is whether electricity or natural gas is the best choice for heating, domestic hot water, and cooking.

She's lucky enough to have both a reliable electricity grid and easy access to natural gas in the small community where she lives. So the practicalities of delivery are not really a concern.

Henry Gifford Publishes a Book

Posted on September 29, 2017 by Martin Holladay in Musings of an Energy Nerd

Henry Gifford is a plumber with a New York accent, working-class roots, and deep erudition. He’s also a well-known designer of heating, cooling, and ventilation systems.

The World Is Facing a Sand Crisis

Posted on September 28, 2017 by Anonymous in Guest Blogs

By Aurora Torres, Jianguo “Jack” Liu, Jodi Brandt, and Kristen Lear

Utilities Grapple with Rooftop Solar and the New Energy Landscape

Posted on September 27, 2017 by Jacques Leslie in Guest Blogs

In the prevailing narrative of the rooftop solar industry, the dominant theme is combat. The good guys are the innovative, climate-positive, customer-pleasing solar companies, which must be nimble to avoid being crushed by the plodding, influence-buying, fossil fuel-spewing dinosaurs of the electricity industry, the utilities.

Are Hazardous Vapors Seeping Into Your Basement?

Posted on September 26, 2017 by Lynne Peeples in Guest Blogs

When Jane Horton bought her dream 800-square-foot farmhouse in 1975, she thought little of the semiconductor manufacturing plant across the street. Even after the company’s buildings were demolished and a chain-link fence went up around the campus, she still had no knowledge of the toxic dangers lurking beneath her feet — let alone of the fact that they were invading her home.

Urban Rustic: A Light Down Below

Posted on September 25, 2017 by Eric Whetzel in Guest Blogs

Editor's note: This post is one of a series by Eric Whetzel about the design and construction of his house in Palatine, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The first blog in his series was called An Introduction to a New Passive House Project; a list of Eric's previous posts appears below. For more details, see Eric's blog, Kimchi & Kraut.

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