GBA Logo horizontal Facebook LinkedIn Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Navigation Search Icon Main Search Icon Video Play Icon Audio Play Icon Headphones Icon Plus Icon Minus Icon Check Icon Print Icon Picture icon Single Arrow Icon Double Arrow Icon Hamburger Icon TV Icon Close Icon Sorted Hamburger/Search Icon
Collection

Fiberglass insulation

Article Image

This is a list of the most important GBA articles about fiberglass insulation.

If you are looking for an index that spans all categories, with a special focus on “how to” articles, check out this resource page: “How to do Everything.”

  • Musings of an Energy Nerd

    Installing Fiberglass Right

    Of all of the commonly used types of insulation — including cellulose, rigid foam, and spray polyurethane foam — fiberglass batts perform the worst. As typically installed, fiberglass batts do little to reduce airflow through a wall or ceiling assembly; rarely fill the entire cavity in which they are installed; and sometimes permit the development of convective loops that degrade insulation performance. Knowing this, why would any builder choose to install fiberglass batts? The answer is simple: because fiberglass batts cost less than any other type of insulation.

  • Green Basics

    Batt and Blanket Insulation

    Inexpensive and Easy to Handle, Batts are The Most Common Insulation UPDATED 8/21/2012

  • Article

    Blown Insulation for Attics: Fiberglass vs. Cellulose

    Both perform better than batts and are less expensive than spray polyurethane. Neither is perfect.

  • Building Science

    Is Compressed Fiberglass Insulation Really a Problem?

    I've been guilty of perpetuating a myth. Not long ago I wrote an article in which I said installing insulation, "cavities [should be] filled completely with as little compression as possible." But is compression really such a bad thing? Here on GBA, commenter Dana Dorsett wrote, "Compression of batts is fine (resulting in a higher R/inch due to the higher density) as long as the cavity is completely filled.”

  • Green Building Curmudgeon

    Batt Insulation is Still Making Me Batty

    I recently performed the pre-drywall inspection on a small home seeking LEED certification. The local building inspector had visited and approved the batts for covering up.

  • Building Science

    Grading the Installation Quality of Insulation

    Six years ago, RESNET published a major revision of the HERS Standards, officially named the 2006 Mortgage Industry National Home Energy Rating Systems Standards. One important new feature in the standards was the grading of insulation installation quality. Before this change, R-13 insulation installed poorly (as shown in the second photo, below) was equivalent to any other R-13 insulation, including insulation with impeccable installation quality (as shown at the top of this article).

  • Green Building Curmudgeon

    Should Batt Insulation Be Outlawed?

    A significant amount of my work these days is certifying homes under one or more of the available green building programs in my area, including EarthCraft House, LEED, and the National Green Building Standard. Recently, I have inspected several homes that were insulated with fiberglass batts, and, not surprisingly, the quality of the installation was dismal. What I saw could have been an instruction manual on how not to insulate a house. Batts were cut 2 to 3 inches wider than the stud spacing and crammed into the cavities.

  • Musings of an Energy Nerd

    Flash-and-Batt Insulation

    Closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation has several desirable characteristics. It’s an excellent air barrier, an excellent vapor retarder, and it has a high insulating value per inch (about R-6). Unfortunately, it’s also expensive.

  • Musings of an Energy Nerd

    Smelly Fiberglass Batts

    I first heard about the problem of smelly fiberglass batts from Michael Maines, a builder and GBA blogger who lives in Portland, Maine. Maines sent me an e-mail saying, “The latest problem with fiberglass insulation is that it smells like burnt brownies!” I’ve collected a half dozen reports of this problem, all centering on EcoTouch brand fiberglass batts manufactured by Owens Corning. Two years ago, the company switched from a formaldehyde-based glue (or binder) to a new glue described as a “bio-based” binder.

  • Article

    Does Fiberglass Insulation Still Make Sense?

    This article takes a close look at the various insulation choices (batts, blow-in, and spray) and discusses their pros, cons and costs. There is significant talk about air infiltration, the hazard it poses, and the best ways to insulate to avoid it.

Related

  • Collection

    Deep Energy Retrofits

    This is a list of the most important GBA articles on deep energy retrofits. If you are looking for an index that spans all categories, with a special focus on…

  • Collection

    Foundations

    This is a list of the most important GBA articles on foundations. If you are looking for an index that spans all categories, with a special focus on "how to"…

  • Collection

    Cellulose insulation

    This is a list of the most important GBA articles on cellulose insulation. If you are looking for an index that spans all categories, with a special focus on "how…

  • Collection

    Air conditioning

    This is a list of the most important GBA articles on air conditioning, fans, and natural methods of cooling. If you are looking for an index that spans all categories,…

Community

Recent Questions and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |