Helpful? 0

Woo-woo alert!

Took a wander through the Building Energy trade-show floor yesterday,
and found a booth handing out flyers about a distinctly sketchy-
sounding fix for rising damp in masonry buildings called "Aquapol".
Aquapol-usa.com for the english website; claimed to have originated
in Europe with thousands of successful deployments. But when they
start talking about rather long-distance non-contact effects on
moisture not to mention various vagueness about "free energy", my
skepticism meter starts jumping. Can anybody comment on this stuff?
If the search-engine here isn't broken, it hasn't been mentioned
to date.

_H*

Asked by Hobbit _
Posted Thu, 03/06/2014 - 21:03
Edited Fri, 03/07/2014 - 08:07

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1 Answer

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Helpful? 0

Hobbit,
I'm not impressed by the website. This is all you get when you click the link for "How Aquapol works":

"The AQUAPOL unit is installed in a specified area in the building and reverses the rising damp by sending it back through the capillary system of the walls where it came from, leading to dehydration.

"The AQUAPOL unit draws upon “space” or so-called “room energy” (which is available anywhere on Earth) so it does not require any artificial energy such as electricity. The dehydration process is therefore carried out in an eco-friendly way. In a physical sense it could be seen as an innovative generator."

Sentences of this sort set my BS-detector on high alert.

Answered by Martin Holladay, GBA Advisor
Posted Fri, 03/07/2014 - 08:10

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