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Community and Q&A

Lighting strategies

Sam Dhak | Posted in Green Building Techniques on

i could not find this on any other forum and hopefully my post is relevant

Is there a way to get natural sunlight into a dark room? I have a 1st floor living room in an attached house (attached from both sides) and this room runs north south and has some windows on the south-facing side. Could I use some technique to light up the whole room using these windows? I see a technique listed here but it needs direct access to the roof
http://www.yougen.co.uk/blog-entry/1760/How+to+bring+sunlight+into+a+dark+room/

Thanks

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Replies

  1. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #1

    Sam,
    If you want natural light in the center of your house, you're going to need a skylight -- either a conventional skylight or one of the newer tubular skylights -- and that means, of course, you need access to the roof.

    Here are two articles on tubular skylights:

    Tubular Skylights Introduce Daylight to Dark Homes

    Tubular Skylights: Gimmick or Good Idea?

  2. Sam Dhak | | #2

    Instead of running the tubes from the roof, can I instead point it somehow on the south-side facing windows?

  3. GBA Editor
    Martin Holladay | | #3

    Sam,
    Q. "Instead of running the tubes from the roof, can I instead point it somehow on the south-side facing windows?"

    A. No. That wouldn't really work, and such an installation would be contrary to the manufacturer's installation instructions. Of course, if you have $10,000 (plus a little more for installation costs), you could install a fiber-optic lighting system: Fiber Optics for Daylighting.

  4. Keith Gustafson | | #4

    I would suggest working with watcha got. What is outside that south facing glass? What color are your walls? Ceiling? Floor?

    I have wood ceilings and it is amazing how much dimmer it is than a house with white ceilings.

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