Q&A Spotlight

Installing Lap Siding Over Foam

Posted on July 10, 2017 by Scott Gibson

William Costello is building a new house in southwest Virginia that will be framed with 2x6s and will include up to 2 inches of exterior rigid foam insulation. He plans on installing 3/4-inch thick plywood furring strips on top of the exterior foam, and then will side the house with LP SmartSide lap siding designed specifically for houses with 24-inch on-center framing.

It all sounded straightforward enough until Costello took a close look at the installation instructions from LP Building Products.

Keeping Cool in Detroit

Posted on June 26, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Like many houses built in the 1960s, Nathan Efrusy's 2,000-square-foot colonial in Detroit has baseboard heat but no central air. A single wall-mounted air conditioner keeps the first floor of the house comfortable, but Efrusy would like to extend AC to the second floor — the question is now to do that effectively.

In a Q&A post, Efrusy says he's been given several options for cooling on the second floor, but he's leaning towards a ductless minisplit.

Dealing With Ductwork in an Unconditioned Attic

Posted on June 12, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Ted has more than a few cobwebs in his attic. The unconditioned space also houses his HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. system.

The 1,800-square-foot brick ranch in Climate Zone 4 dates from the 1960s, but the previous owner installed both a furnace and ductwork in the attic just four years ago. Ted also has inherited a powered attic ventilator. Although both the attic floor and the ductwork are insulated, Ted recognizes the situation isn't ideal.

Making the Case for Exterior Foam Insulation

Posted on May 29, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Writing from Climate Zone 3, Farm House seems to have worked out many of the details for the dream house he plans to start building in a few months.

"Plan to live in it for 30+ years," he writes in a post at the Q&A forum at Green Building Advisor. "The house will have Zip System sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. and will be well insulated on the inside. I will just leave it at that. Not interested in installing rigid foam on the outside of the roof sheathing. (I have my reasons, so please don't try to convince me otherwise.)

All-Electric vs. Natural Gas

Posted on May 15, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Given a photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow. system with a capacity of as much as 8 kilowatts, does it make any sense to include natural gas appliances in a new house, or would an all-electric design be more practical?

That's the question Markus ponders as he plans a new house in Houston, Texas. Although he has natural gas service in the house where he currently lives, the size of his new rooftop solar system could prompt a change of heart.

Tackling an Energy Remodel in New Hampshire

Posted on May 1, 2017 by Scott Gibson

From the sound of it, Ben Balcombe is about to buy a house built like many others in New England in the 1980s: 2x6 walls (presumably insulated with fiberglass batt insulationInsulation, usually of fiberglass or mineral wool and often faced with paper, typically installed between studs in walls and between joists in ceiling cavities. Correct installation is crucial to performance. ), double-pane windows, baseboard hydronic heat linked to an oil-fired boiler, and vinylCommon term for polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate). siding. The house is in southern New Hampshire in Climate Zone 5.

Balcombe plans to renovate the house in phases. He'd launch a kitchen and bath remodel "as soon as we get the keys," with other upgrades to follow.

Roof Assembly for a Getaway Cottage

Posted on April 17, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Plans are taking shape for Quinn Sievewright's holdiay home: a small retreat with a shed roof that will be built in Climate Zone 4 near Vancouver, Canada. During the winter, the building won't be occupied full-time, but enough so that Sievewright has included several layers or rigid foam insulation in the design for his low-pitch roof. (The drawing at right shows how he's proposed to build it.)

Are Ductless Minisplits Overpriced?

Posted on April 3, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Ductless minisplit heat pumps have received a tremendous amount of attention in the last several years, and Peter L. would like to include one in his own house. There's only one problem: an estimate that seems far higher than it should.

"I was quoted $4,800 to purchase and install a Mitsubishi Mr. Slim 1-ton unit (MSZFE12NA)," Peter writes at GBA's Q&A forum. "That seems very high. Especially since it's a new build and the 3-inch hole is already in the wall."

Is This SIP Roof In Trouble?

Posted on March 20, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Matt Melton lives in central Washington state in a 3-year-old house with a roof made of structural insulated panels (SIPs) that are 12 1/4 inches thick. The pitch of the roof is very low, only 1/2 inch-in-12, and the metal roofing has been applied directly over the SIPs with no air channel beneath the roofing for ventilation.

Adding Air Conditioning to Radiant-Floor Heat

Posted on February 27, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Radiant-floor heating systems are unobtrusive because the plastic tubing that distributes hot water around the house is buried in or under the floor. Homeowners like that. But because there are no air ducts with a radiant-floor system, air conditioning must be added separately.

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