Q&A Spotlight

Is a Ground-Source Heat Pump the Right Choice?

Posted on October 24, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Ben Rush likes the idea of a ground-source heat pumpHome heating and cooling system that relies on the mass of the earth as the heat source and heat sink. Temperatures underground are relatively constant. Using a ground-source heat pump, heat from fluid circulated through an underground loop is transferred to and/or from the home through a heat exchanger. The energy performance of ground-source heat pumps is usually better than that of air-source heat pumps; ground-source heat pumps also perform better over a wider range of above-ground temperatures., despite their reputation for higher cost than other heating and cooling alternatives.

A ground-source heat pump (GSHPs) requires heat-exchange tubing buried in the ground or inserted in a well or pond. The excavation required to bury the lines (or drill an extra well or two) helps to make GSHPs more expensive than air-source units. In addition, the equipment itself tends to be more costly. In all, GSHPs suffer a significant disadvantage when it comes to cost.

Questions About HVAC, Insulation, and Ventilation

Posted on October 10, 2016 by Scott Gibson

C. Clark is preparing to move from a dry region to Lady's Island, South Carolina, an area with a warm, humid climate that is the mirror opposite of the climate in Clark's former home. Clark is highly allergic to mold, and that has him thinking about ventilation, insulation, and his HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. system.

Heading Off Ice Dams

Posted on September 26, 2016 by Scott Gibson

With the onset of another winter just a few months away, Jake Rabe is looking for suggestions on how to prevent the recurrence of ice dams on his older Ontario home.

"Each winter I have to deal with ice damming along two sides of the roof — nowhere else," he writes in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor. "The areas in question are a low-slope roof (3/12 pitch, east and west side of the ridge) and a cathedral style roof (8/12 pitch)... My goal is to stop the ice damming."

Fixing a Glitch in a Double-Stud Wall

Posted on September 12, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Adam Peterson is building a house with double-stud exterior walls, and he's run into a problem.

"Blame it on lack of clarity on my part," Peterson writes in a post at GBA's Q&A forum, "but when my framer built my double-stud walls he didn't oversize the window rough openings to account for 1/2-inch plywood sheathingMaterial, usually plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), but sometimes wooden boards, installed on the exterior of wall studs, rafters, or roof trusses; siding or roofing installed on the sheathing—sometimes over strapping to create a rainscreen. connecting the inner to the outer walls. He figured that this gap could be covered solely with drywall."

How to Insulate the Attic in a 1910 Remodel

Posted on August 29, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Tim Lange is taking on a major renovation of his 1910 home in North Dakota that will include a new roof, exterior spray-foam insulation, and new doors and windows. His quandary is what to do in the attic.

"I think I've got a good handle on the exterior insulation process — using window bucks to create an 'outie' style window is the current plan," Lange writes in a Q&A post at GBA. "The third floor and attic are where I need some help."

Tweaking Plans for a Minisplit System

Posted on August 15, 2016 by Scott Gibson

A GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com reader by the name of Green Heron has recommendations in hand from an HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. contractor for heating and cooling a Climate Zone 2 house currently undergoing renovations. But he's not sure whether the recommendations make sense.

The contractor has proposed a four-zone system using a mix of ductless and ducted minisplits, Green Heron explains in a post in GBA's Q&A Forum. A single 3-ton compressor would run the four indoor heads — two ducted units installed in the attic, and ductless units in both the kitchen and the living room.

How to Vent a Dryer

Posted on August 1, 2016 by Scott Gibson

The exhaust from a conventional clothes dryer is full of moisture and lint, and the best place to vent it is directly outside. Matt Culik knows this, but his particular situation makes him wonder whether there are circumstances when this rule might be broken.

Culik will soon be moving into a new house, and the intended laundry room does not have a vent connection for a clothes dryer. Coincidentally, he is planning to replace an old electric hot water heater with a heat-pump water heaterAn appliance that uses an air-source heat pump to heat domestic hot water. Most heat-pump water heaters include an insulated tank equipped with an electric resistance element to provide backup heat whenever hot water demand exceeds the capacity of the heat pump. Since heat-pump water heaters extract heat from the air, they lower the temperature and humidity of the room in which they are installed. , and this has given him an idea.

Mounting Baseboard Heaters Unconventionally

Posted on July 18, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Writing from Detroit, a Climate Zone 6 locale, Marlena Crows poses this question: Must electric baseboard heaters necessarily be installed at floor level, or can they be mounted higher on the wall and get an assist for heat distribution from a ceiling fan?

Will This Roof Design Have Problems?

Posted on July 4, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Planning a new house in Climate Zone 6, Chad Kotlarz is reviewing his architect's plans for the roof — and discovers he has a few misgivings.

The unvented roof will be framed with 2x12 rafters, sheathed with plywood and capped with standing-seam metal roofing. Closed-cell spray foam will insulate the rafter bays, and the interior of the cathedral ceiling will be finished with gypsum drywall. An exposed truss with a collar tie provides structural support.

Making the Best PEX Connections

Posted on June 20, 2016 by Scott Gibson

Building his “forever house,” Dean Sandbo is mulling what type of tubing to use for his plumbing supply lines. He has narrowed the choice to one of two types of cross-linked polyethylene (PEXCross-linked polyethylene. Specialized type of polyethylene plastic that is strengthened by chemical bonds formed in addition to the usual bonds in the polymerization process. PEX is used primarily as tubing for hot- and cold-water distribution and radiant-floor heating.): PEX-A or PEX-B.

Key issues, Sandbo notes in his Q&A post at GBA, are how long the tubing will last, and whether there are safety concerns — that is, will the PEX tubing leach chemicals into his drinking water?

"I am on a well," he writes. "Any input as to the longevity and safety of these two different types of pipes?"

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