Q&A Spotlight

Can Bathroom Fans Be Used to Distribute Heat?

Posted on October 16, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Debra's new house in southwestern Virginia will be a one-story design of 1,344 square feet with half the space devoted to a single, open room and the remaining area divided into two bedrooms, two baths, and a utility room. The main source of heat will be in the open room, and in the absence of a conventional forced air heating system, Debra's quandary is how to distribute the heat evenly.

Gas vs. Electric for Heating, Cooking, and Hot Water

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Lydia Segal is planning a 2,000-square foot house in Colorado (Climate Zone 6B), and aiming for "Pretty Good House" performance. Among the many questions she's trying to answer is whether electricity or natural gas is the best choice for heating, domestic hot water, and cooking.

She's lucky enough to have both a reliable electricity grid and easy access to natural gas in the small community where she lives. So the practicalities of delivery are not really a concern.

How to Vent a Rainscreen

Posted on September 18, 2017 by Scott Gibson

A vented rainscreenConstruction detail appropriate for all but the driest climates to prevent moisture entry and to extend the life of siding and sheathing materials; most commonly produced by installing thin strapping to hold the siding away from the sheathing by a quarter-inch to three-quarters of an inch. — an air gap behind the siding — has become a standard detail in many new houses. It helps remove moisture that works its way through the siding, and in the process helps siding last longer. It's the "vented" part of this equation that has Gerald Pehl thinking.

"I've got an assembly design for a vented rainscreen, and it will be held continuous to the soffit spaces, which then vent through to the attic ridge vent via conventional vent chutes between the rafters," Pehl says in a comment posted in the Q&A forum at GBAGreenBuildingAdvisor.com.

Fixing a Poorly Insulated Roof

Posted on September 4, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Chris Butson's Utah home sits at an elevation of 6,000 feet and experiences everything from sub-zero temperatures in the winter to 100-degree summer days. Built in 1994, the house has what Butson believes is an underinsulated roof that contributes to big electric bills and massive ice dams.

Insulating a New House

Posted on August 21, 2017 by Scott Gibson

An owner-builder planning a new home in southern Ontario isn't looking for a net-zero house, just one that's well insulated and protected from moisture problems. The question is whether his proposed wall system is his best option.

"I'm unwilling to put foam board on the outside and vapor barrier on the inside," writes User 6782048, whom we'll just call Ontario, in a question posted on our Q&A page. "Just seems wrong."

There’s Rot in the Roof

Posted on August 7, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Chuck Kramer's home in Enumclaw, Washington, was built in the 1980s with unvented cathedral ceilings, insulated with cut-and-cobble rigid foam insulation and roofed with cedar shakes. A small section of the roof is showing signs of water damage, and now Kramer is trying to find a way of repairing the problem area without tearing into the rest of the roof.

Choosing the Cheapest Path to Net Zero

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Writing from northeast Ohio, a reader with the screen name “User-6877304” — let's call him Steve — is seeking comments on his plans to build an affordable net-zero energyProducing as much energy on an annual basis as one consumes on site, usually with renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics or small-scale wind turbines. home. The house, to be built on a 30-foot by 50-foot slab-on-grade foundation, seems to have many characteristics of a "Pretty Good House" — that is, it's well insulated and ventilated but not attempting to hit the Passive HouseA residential building construction standard requiring very low levels of air leakage, very high levels of insulation, and windows with a very low U-factor. Developed in the early 1990s by Bo Adamson and Wolfgang Feist, the standard is now promoted by the Passivhaus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany. To meet the standard, a home must have an infiltration rate no greater than 0.60 AC/H @ 50 pascals, a maximum annual heating energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (4,755 Btu per square foot), a maximum annual cooling energy use of 15 kWh per square meter (1.39 kWh per square foot), and maximum source energy use for all purposes of 120 kWh per square meter (11.1 kWh per square foot). The standard recommends, but does not require, a maximum design heating load of 10 W per square meter and windows with a maximum U-factor of 0.14. The Passivhaus standard was developed for buildings in central and northern Europe; efforts are underway to clarify the best techniques to achieve the standard for buildings in hot climates. metric.

Steve plans to install R-10 rigid insulation beneath the slab. The house will have double-stud walls insulated with cellulose to R-40 and a raised-heel truss roof insulated to R-60.

Installing Lap Siding Over Foam

Posted on July 10, 2017 by Scott Gibson

William Costello is building a new house in southwest Virginia that will be framed with 2x6s and will include up to 2 inches of exterior rigid foam insulation. He plans on installing 3/4-inch thick plywood furring strips on top of the exterior foam, and then will side the house with LP SmartSide lap siding designed specifically for houses with 24-inch on-center framing.

It all sounded straightforward enough until Costello took a close look at the installation instructions from LP Building Products.

Keeping Cool in Detroit

Posted on June 26, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Like many houses built in the 1960s, Nathan Efrusy's 2,000-square-foot colonial in Detroit has baseboard heat but no central air. A single wall-mounted air conditioner keeps the first floor of the house comfortable, but Efrusy would like to extend AC to the second floor — the question is now to do that effectively.

In a Q&A post, Efrusy says he's been given several options for cooling on the second floor, but he's leaning towards a ductless minisplit.

Dealing With Ductwork in an Unconditioned Attic

Posted on June 12, 2017 by Scott Gibson

Ted has more than a few cobwebs in his attic. The unconditioned space also houses his HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). Collectively, the mechanical systems that heat, ventilate, and cool a building. system.

The 1,800-square-foot brick ranch in Climate Zone 4 dates from the 1960s, but the previous owner installed both a furnace and ductwork in the attic just four years ago. Ted also has inherited a powered attic ventilator. Although both the attic floor and the ductwork are insulated, Ted recognizes the situation isn't ideal.

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